11.2kW Ecodan in 18...
 
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11.2kW Ecodan in 182sqm property

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(@sand)
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310 kWhs
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Posts: 67
Topic starter  

Hi, thanks so much for all the information regards ashp, I have gained so much great knowledge.

I moved into new build 3 wks ago with a ecodan 11.2, property 182sq mtrs. very well insulated. Ashp installed by developer so no input into design and very very scant handover. Basically, leave alone, in the engineers words " set it and forget it" 🙄 well he isn't paying my electricity bill! so I came to the forum to learn  how to use the system efficiently and economically.

So first thing was to reduce flow from 60c to 45c this reduced the cost from about £50 in first 4 days to £60 the following 7 days ( thats total electricity) now I have melcloud app I can track energy useage just for ecodan. 

Secondly changed water temp from 50 to 47 and from normal to eco.

We keep system running 24/7 we have 7 room thermostats for ufh throughout downstairs and rads upstairs, we think they are K3 but not sure. We have a wireless controller for upstairs too.

I tried to reduce the flow to 40 but the rads didn't get very warm so I a have reduced flow to 44 and going to see if that makes a difference and then reduce incrementally until we feel a change in the comfort level. I'm "nesh" is that word only used in Yorkshire 😀, so like the upstairs 20 and downstairs 21degrees.

As its been such a steep learning curve ( no pun intended ) I'm leaving compenstation curve settings until weather gets a bit warmer, I understand the concept  just dont know what to set it at yet.

My main question is we have water tank in garage and its freezing in there do we have to insultate the water tank?

Many thanks again for all great information, although at times it goes way above my head Im willing to learn.

 

 


   
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(@kev-m)
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@sand 

welcome to the forum.  Don't be afraid of weather compensation.  All it does is change the flow temperature according to how cold it is outside.  Even if you find 40C works one day, if/when it's colder that might not be enough to heat the house, even if your thermostats are telling the ASHP to keep heating.  

Another point is that radiators don't have to feel that hot to heat the house, especially in a well insulated new build.  They work mostly by convection, ie. warm air coming out the top rather than radiating heat from the front. Unless it's really cold, 40C heat my house very well.  You need to try and forget the piping hot gas/oil heating radiators you're probably used to.

If you need help with the Ecodan settings please ask as there is a lot of knowledge here.  


   
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(@sand)
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Posts: 67
Topic starter  

Thanks for that Kev M. Yeah the rads never get red hot, but when I turned it to 40 it struggled to get to 19 degrees upstairs no change with ufh. Thats why I'm going to check with the builder to see if the rads are K3. When we first moved in we had issues with rads as system had not been on, pressure had dropped so we had to realign pressure gauge on water tank and bleed them. Today it feels toasty warm at 44c but will keep lowering it, because I think I read for every 1 degree reduction we will save money. Also we have only been here 3 weeks we have no blinds/curtains or carpets so that will also be a factor, so glad to hear 40c is achievable.

 


 


   
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(@derek-m)
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Posted by: @sand

Thanks for that Kev M. Yeah the rads never get red hot, but when I turned it to 40 it struggled to get to 19 degrees upstairs no change with ufh. Thats why I'm going to check with the builder to see if the rads are K3. When we first moved in we had issues with rads as system had not been on, pressure had dropped so we had to realign pressure gauge on water tank and bleed them. Today it feels toasty warm at 44c but will keep lowering it, because I think I read for every 1 degree reduction we will save money. Also we have only been here 3 weeks we have no blinds/curtains or carpets so that will also be a factor, so glad to hear 40c is achievable.

 


 

Hi Sand,

Welcome to the forum.

Kev is perfectly correct, that for better efficiency you should be utilising weather compensation, though if your FTC controller is located in a suitable position you could use auto adaptation, which would keep the indoor air temperature more constant. They are predicting a warmer spell in the near future, so you could probably find that with weather compensation or auto adaptation the water flow temperature would be lowered to the mid 30's.

K3 radiators have 3 heating panels, K2, obviously two, so it should be easy to check what you have.

Do you have any heat loss calculations and do you know that total heating capacity of your radiators and UFH?

Do you have a buffer tank or low loss header?

If the radiators are the correct size and have been bled, but you are still not getting sufficient heat to the bedrooms, then it could be that your system is not correctly balanced. That is that you are not getting sufficient water flow to the upstairs radiators.


   
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(@sand)
Estimable Member Member
310 kWhs
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 67
Topic starter  

Hi Derek sorry no heat loss calcs system already in place when we moved in the epc rating was B. Other than that i wouldn't know where to start.

20211211 130126
20211211 130043

Not sute re buffer so see attached images, think rads are K2 then, size wise they look big. Not the most aesthetically pleasing rads but we hoping to change them in future will look for K3 now. They have all been  bled and pressure gauge aligned.

20211211 131213

This is our default compensation curve set by installers, what should we set it too. Because we still learning about the system we just reduced flow as that seemed the easiest thing to do, quickest win re economy as it had been set at 60.

Ta for help.

 


   
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(@derek-m)
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@sand 

Hi Sand,

It is impossible to tell from the photo if you have a buffer tank or low loss header. It could be incorporated within the bottom section of your hot water cylinder. If you Google the manufacturer and model you should be able to find out the details.

Do you know if your system has been zoned?

Since your home should be quite well insulated, I would suggest trying a weather compensation curve of 50C water flow temperature at -10C ambient air temperature and 25C water flow temperature at 20C ambient air temperature. It is then a matter of monitoring the change in indoor temperature with changes in outdoor temperature, and making adjustments so that the indoor temperature remains reasonably constant with variations in ambient air temperature.

You will of course need to turn up your thermostats by 1C or 2C, so that they are not interfering with the weather compensation.

This post was modified 3 years ago 2 times by Derek M

   
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Morgan
(@morgan)
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@derek-m 

That tank, in fact pretty much that install is nearly identical to mine.  My installers informed me no buffer or low loss header.

Retrofitted 11.2kw Mitsubishi Ecodan to new radiators commissioned November 2021.


   
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(@sand)
Estimable Member Member
310 kWhs
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 67
Topic starter  

Thanks  for replies.

Yes Derek the system has been zoned zone 1 is downstiars zone 2 is upstairs. I'll have a go and will let you how the weather compensation changes go.


   
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(@derek-m)
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@sand 

Do you have any water pumps external to the ASHP?

Also what is the arrangement of the control valves?


   
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(@sand)
Estimable Member Member
310 kWhs
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 67
Topic starter  
  1. Hi Derek I don't think so, see images re what I think are the control valves, I have a manifold too in cloakroom thats always lovely and warm. 
    20211211 171323
    20211211 171312
    20211211 171303
    20211211 171259

     

     


   
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(@derek-m)
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@sand 

They look more like pressure relief valves. If you cannot identify an item of equipment then get the manufacturers name and model number and consult Dr. Google. If you are still not certain then send me the details and I will try to identify it.

The red item in the fourth photo is a water pump, which appears to be connected to the bottom section of the cylinder, it therefore may be the buffer tank.

There should also be a set of control valves for your UFH, and probably a 3 way diverter valve for DHW or Heating control.

This post was modified 3 years ago by Derek M

   
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(@derek-m)
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@sand 

My mistake, on closer inspection the pipework from the pump is going through the wall and not connected to the cylinder.


   
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