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Heat pumps & dry air leading to sinus problems and headaches?

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(@gurugurugravity)
Eminent Member Member
120 kWhs
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 8
Topic starter  

Firstly I love my heat pump. This will be my first winter with mine and so far so good. Really happy with its performance.

 

Except for one thing (and it's something I had problems with with my gas central heating too.)

 

Does anyone else get sinus problems and headaches from the toasty heat? I'm keeping my home warm with weather compensation aiming for 20 degrees (mostly because if I go lower my partner complains of being cold) but I'm really struggling with breathing and head pain issues. Possibly a bit worse now because the heating is staying on all the time at a lower temperature overnight (which is not something I previously did).

 

Any advice for how to make myself more comfortable? Sorry if this is a silly question but I couldn't see anything about this and as as person with two chronic illnesses (unrelated that aren't causing these symptoms) this means I am in pain a lot and this sort of thing has an impact on me. Working from home too.

 

I appreciate this is probably due to drier air and dust but I also live in a victorian semi (so damp can be an issue) and I need something a bit gentler on my house than a humidifier.

 

Lots of advice online for gas system and other systems, but I'd appreciate some thought and feedback from other heat pump owners. 


   
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(@benseb)
Reputable Member Member
735 kWhs
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 105
 

It’s probably the humidity. Do you have anything which can tell you the current humidity?

 

If it’s less than say 40% you might. Want to pop a dish of water on the radiators to evaporate and raise the humidity so it’s not as dry. 

250sqm house. 30kWh Sunsynk/Pylontech battery system. 14kWp solar. Ecodan 14kW. BMW iX.


   
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(@derek-m)
Illustrious Member Moderator
13765 kWhs
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Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 4169
 
Posted by: @gurugurugravity

Firstly I love my heat pump. This will be my first winter with mine and so far so good. Really happy with its performance.

 

Except for one thing (and it's something I had problems with with my gas central heating too.)

 

Does anyone else get sinus problems and headaches from the toasty heat? I'm keeping my home warm with weather compensation aiming for 20 degrees (mostly because if I go lower my partner complains of being cold) but I'm really struggling with breathing and head pain issues. Possibly a bit worse now because the heating is staying on all the time at a lower temperature overnight (which is not something I previously did).

 

Any advice for how to make myself more comfortable? Sorry if this is a silly question but I couldn't see anything about this and as as person with two chronic illnesses (unrelated that aren't causing these symptoms) this means I am in pain a lot and this sort of thing has an impact on me. Working from home too.

 

I appreciate this is probably due to drier air and dust but I also live in a victorian semi (so damp can be an issue) and I need something a bit gentler on my house than a humidifier.

 

Lots of advice online for gas system and other systems, but I'd appreciate some thought and feedback from other heat pump owners. 

Hi,

It might be worthwhile buying a humidity meter, so that you can see if it is too high or too low. You can then experiment with methods of getting it to your liking.


   
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(@gurugurugravity)
Eminent Member Member
120 kWhs
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 8
Topic starter  

Thanks for replying, yes we have quite a damp house, I have humidity sensors and thermometers in most rooms. We have three floors and it is quite open plan. 

Humidity is normally between 50-60% we have a dehumidifier in our living room which is on a timer a few hours at night, and when I see it’s getting too high. 

 

This post was modified 2 years ago 2 times by Gurugurugravity

   
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 robl
(@robl)
Reputable Member Member
2313 kWhs
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 180
 

@gurugurugravity 

Unless you have an extremely unusual reason for a damp house, a dehumifier may be an issue.  Unusual reasons include a new house drying out, driving rain getting through brickwork, rising damp.  

The reason I say the above is that in my experience it's harder to control the level of CO2 to an acceptable level(<1000ppm) than reduce the humidity in a house in the UK down to 50% RH (generally considered the optimum, see piccy).  The use of a dehumidifier may then remove moisture from the air, while leaving the high level of CO2.  High CO2 levels (>1000ppm) internally causes drowseyness, loss of concentration, headaches.  In contrast, opening a window, or using heat recovery ventilation, controls both humidity and CO2. 

I recommend that you get a CO2 monitor - they used to be expensive, but can be bought these days for £40 or so.

 

image

   
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(@gurugurugravity)
Eminent Member Member
120 kWhs
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 8
Topic starter  

I’m actually pretty careful about my dehumidifier use, as mentioned we have a Victorian semi we have rising damp and it’s pretty useful for keeping it under control. It only comes on for about three hours a night on the ground floor when when sleep on the third floor. It’s worth saying that damp has a pretty bad impact on your health too.

 

We aim for around 50% humidity and our house would be in a worse state if I didn’t do this. 


   
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(@benseb)
Reputable Member Member
735 kWhs
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 105
 

 Could it be mould spores?

 

when the heating comes on it starts warm air convection currents which may well increase exposure?

250sqm house. 30kWh Sunsynk/Pylontech battery system. 14kWp solar. Ecodan 14kW. BMW iX.


   
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(@heat-pump-newbie)
Reputable Member Member
1446 kWhs
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 166
 

What ventilation do you have @gurugurugravity ?


   
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