28 September 2021
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Low profile wet underfloor heating


Ken
 Ken
(@ken)
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Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 10
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Does anyone have any experience of retrofitting low profile wet underfloor heating?

We are looking at getting it fitted but would like some real world experience of the installation and usage experience.

So far a local plumber has said it's do'able, can be installed in phases (so we don't have to move out...) and and can be laid out to work with GSHP should we want to install one at a later date. In the meantime it would be running via the oil boiler.

 

I guess the main questions are:-

How much head height would be lost?

Can it be laid on a rough(ish) concrete slab?

Are we likely to have higher oil usage than our current standard arrangement of radiators?

 

Thanks 🙂 

 


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Derek M
(@derek-m)
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Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 293
 

Hi Ken,

If it is what I think you mean, I looked at this some time ago, though I did not go ahead since our present radiators are more than adequate to do the job.

If my memory serves me well. it increases the floor height by about 3cm and consists of a bottom section in which the pipes are laid and the a top cover. You can then put laminated flooring or carpets on top of this.

My son had UFH installed last year, so I will see if he had the type that you mentioned and possibly provide further information.

Regards,

Derek.

 

 


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Derek M
(@derek-m)
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Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 293
 

Hi Ken,

Here is the reply from my son.

For larger retrofit (like we did) there are a number of systems on the market (some new ones now that weren’t available when we did ours).  Ours is a slimline screeded system which reduced headroom by ~30mm.  The benefit of this system was minimised prep – fitted on top of existing damp proofed concrete floor.  The down side is that any insulation you add reduced headroom further – we used some slimline panels.  In terms of efficiency, our heating costs have remained pretty stable from having radiators, but it is a nicer (more consistent) temperature and we don’t have radiators cluttering up the walls.  We also now have a double-height space which will probably negatively effect our heating costs.

Hope this helps.

Regards,

Derek.

 


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Ken
 Ken
(@ken)
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Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 10
Topic starter  
Posted by: @derek-m

Hi Ken,

Here is the reply from my son.

For larger retrofit (like we did) there are a number of systems on the market (some new ones now that weren’t available when we did ours).  Ours is a slimline screeded system which reduced headroom by ~30mm.  The benefit of this system was minimised prep – fitted on top of existing damp proofed concrete floor.  The down side is that any insulation you add reduced headroom further – we used some slimline panels.  In terms of efficiency, our heating costs have remained pretty stable from having radiators, but it is a nicer (more consistent) temperature and we don’t have radiators cluttering up the walls.  We also now have a double-height space which will probably negatively effect our heating costs.

Hope this helps.

Regards,

Derek.

 

Thanks for the feedback, that's good to know.


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Derek M
(@derek-m)
Member Moderator
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 293
 

Hi Ken,

The other thing that I forgot to mention, there is an upper operating temperature limit for UFH, so you will need suitable controls and possibly a mixing valve arrangement to prevent it from overheating.

If your plumber is anything decent he should be able to give you advice.

Regards,

Derek.


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