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Ripple Energy versus Tesla Energy Plan


ChickenBig
(@chickenbig)
New Member
172 kWhs
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 20
Topic starter  

I've been doing some thinking about how to power an all-electric house and have found two ways to (partially) hedge the high electricity prices. I'm sure plenty of other people have looked at how to offset future price uncertainty

Note that to be perfectly transparent, I've signed up to the Ripple Energy cooperative to the tune of 1516 W, although the PowerWall 2 now looks tempting.

 

Ripple Energy

  • Invest in a cooperative which wants to build a wind turbine (planning to be commissioned in November 2023);
  • Money is given back through your electricity bill (you need to switch energy supplier to a Ripple Energy supply partner);
  • Return dependent on the performance of the turbine, as well as the value of the electricity generated.

Benefits

  • Hedges against electricity increases, provided the value of electricity generated is similar to the value of electricity consumed.
  • Be part of the change you want to see, by directly funding the construction of a wind turbine

Disbenefits

  • Does not hedge against non-wholesale cost of electricity (e.g. distribution). Increased UK wind-farm capacity may cause the value of electricity generated by wind to fall (unless this is supported by government policy);
  • Choice of energy supplier is very restricted once the wind farm has been built;
  • Hand over money now and see the benefits in 19 months;
  • The cooperative was only partly funded by the end of March, which may result in reduced return due to having to use debt to finance the project;
  • The cooperative disbands 25 years after the wind turbine starts generating, leaving you with nothing;
  • The tax arrangements for returned money is somewhat involved, and the membership arrangements are not very flexible, which is understandable given this is a large piece of kit.

 

Tesla Energy Plan

  • Requires a Tesla Powerwall 2 and solar panels;
  • Sign up to the Tesla Energy Plan and hand over control of the battery to them;
  • Symmetrical tariff of ~ 11.24 p/kWh, with a 22 p/day standing charge

Benefits

  • Low cost of electricity drawn from the grid;
  • High price of electricity sold back to the grid;
  • Powerwall can sit outdoors, which simplifies installation in a small home;

Disbenefits

  • Powerwall supply delays?;
  • Large up-front cost (£9100 for the Powerwall, unless it is installed at the same time as solar power, in which case you get around £1500 of VAT back);
  • Tied to one electricity supplier (Octopus, so not all bad);
  • How long will these advantageous rates last? Is Tesla making a loss on this offering, or is it doing something clever with the electricity, like propping up the electricity grid when people use the Supercharger stations?
  • 10 year warranty of the Powerwall, after which it could have 80% of its capacity (although the Battery Test Centre estimates 79% capacity after 2110 cycles).

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weoleyric
(@weoleyric)
New Member
46 kWhs
Joined: 2 weeks ago
Posts: 4
 

@ChickenBig We've invested in the Ripple Energy Kirk Hill project for 3.593kW.

Just this week, the project was fully funded although won't start energy production until November 2023.

So, we'll wait and see how this pans out!


ChickenBig and Mars liked
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ChickenBig
(@chickenbig)
New Member
172 kWhs
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 20
Topic starter  

@weoleyric I ended up with just under 2200W of the farm. I wonder the impact of them having to borrow 30% of the funds will be (given rising interest rates); a 2:1 ratio of capital to loans is a pretty safe bet from a lender's perspective, right?


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