Samsung’s Cold Shoulder: Should Heat Pump Manufacturers Be More Accountable?

Samsung cold shoulder

We recently encountered a concerning situation on the Renewable Heating Hub Forums that highlights a crucial question for the renewable heating industry: Should heat pump manufacturers take more responsibility when homeowners face issues with botched, subpar installations?

This question is especially relevant considering the actions of Daikin and Grant in the UK. They often send out engineers to inspect installations and advise installers on correcting systems that are not performing optimally using their equipment. To my mind, such proactive efforts quickly resolve issues and positively impact the brands’ and industry’s reputation.

So we recently came across David’s story, a homeowner dealing with serious issues with his Samsung heat pump system. The main concern was an overly long defrost cycle, which affected the system’s efficiency and reduced the comfort of his home. To seek a resolution, I took to LinkedIn (where I have a growing network of heating engineers and manufacturer contacts) to reach out to Samsung about the issue, and a senior product specialist and trainer from Samsung commented on David’s situation. I’ve opted not to disclose the name of this employee in this post.

Initially, the interaction with the product specialist seemed promising; he engaged in a discussion about the problem, identifying what he believed were not the causes, without attributing any fault to the heat pump itself or suggesting any solutions. However, the conversation shifted abruptly when I politely questioned Samsung’s responsibility and accountability to help homeowners facing problems due to poor installations, particularly those carried out by supposedly Samsung-trained installers. I also asked whether Samsung would send out one of its engineers like Daikin and Grant do to inspect David’s system and to see if they could identify the fault.

Following my question, the Samsung specialist promptly deleted all his comments, likely recognising that his input (and lack of acceptable answers) could potentially attract negative attention towards Samsung’s stance in not wanting to assist homeowners or consumers. Notably, his final comment, wishing David “good luck” in sorting out his dilemma was also removed.

This episode not only casts doubts on Samsung’s dedication to customer satisfaction post-sale but also highlights a potential wider issue within the industry. When installations fail to meet expectations, the lack of manufacturer intervention not only places a burden on homeowners but also negatively impacts the perception of renewable heating solutions.

The problematic installation in David’s case, presumably carried out by a Samsung-approved installer, exhibited significant flaws, such as pipework that some reputed installers have labeled as “very poor”, and even the Samsung specialist hinted that the performance of the heat pump was down to a poor installation. These issues point to potential shortcomings in Samsung’s installer approval processes.

While it’s understood that manufacturers like Samsung, whose primary role is to supply and sell units, should not be directly blamed for installation errors made by independent installers, there is a pressing expectation for manufacturers to play a part in resolving such issues.

At a minimum, manufacturers should investigate reported installation problems, share findings with both the homeowner and installer, and suggest corrective actions. This approach not only helps ensure system efficiency but also bolsters customer satisfaction. As the market for renewable heating solutions grows, the way companies like Samsung handle these situations will be pivotal in shaping consumer confidence and promoting the adoption of green technologies.

So what do you think? Should heat manufacturers be more accountable when heat pumps are poorly installed?

Samsung’s Reputation on Thin Ice

I’m aware that many homeowners on our forums and website have had successful Samsung heat pump installations and that their systems are performing very well.

However, Samsung’s handling—or lack thereof—of David’s case, combined with our recent personal experiences, suggests a shift in their customer support ethos. It seems they’ve grown complacent, resting on the laurels of their established reputation, and now show less concern for customer support post-purchase when things go wrong.

My skepticism about Samsung’s commitment to its reputation, particularly regarding customer satisfaction and quality control, is not baseless. It’s been further solidified by my own troublesome experience with a Samsung fridge freezer – it’s a long read, and I’m still outraged about how Samsung have dealt with us. Despite Samsung acknowledging the issue, their response lacked the concern one would expect. Our situation mirrors the frustrations expressed by many other homeowners who have encountered similar problems with their fridges, highlighting a pattern of disregard for customer grievances.

This personal experience points to a larger problem with Samsung’s approach to customer service. The issue extends beyond the mere inconvenience of having to defrost an appliance; it touches on the basic expectations of reliability and support consumers have when they choose to invest in a brand. Samsung’s apparent indifference to product malfunctions and customer concerns raises significant questions about their dedication to maintaining their reputation and ensuring customer satisfaction.

For me, as a consumer, I’ll never buy another Samsung appliance ever again based on their lack of after-sales customer support.

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iantelescope
1357 kWhs
1 month ago



We recently encountered a concerning situation on the Renewable Heating Hub Forums that highlights a crucial question for the renewable heating industry: Should heat pump manufacturers take more responsibility when homeowners face issues with botched, subpar installations?


This question is especially relevant considering the actions of Daikin and Grant in the UK. They often send out engineers to inspect installations and advise installers on correcting systems that are not performing optimally using their equipment. To my mind, such proactive efforts quickly resolve issues and positively impact the brands’ and industry’s reputation.


So we recently came across David’s story, a homeowner dealing with serious issues with his Samsung heat pump system. The main concern was an overly long defrost cycle, which affected the system’s efficiency and reduced the comfort of his home. To seek a resolution, I took to LinkedIn (where I have a growing network of heating engineers and manufacturer contacts) to reach out to Samsung about the issue, and a senior product specialist and trainer from Samsung commented on David’s situation. I’ve opted not to disclose the name of this employee in this post.


Initially, the interaction with the product specialist seemed promising; he engaged in a discussion about the problem, identifying what he believed were not the causes, without attributing any fault to the heat pump itself or suggesting any solutions. However, the conversation shifted abruptly when I politely questioned Samsung’s responsibility and accountability to help homeowners facing problems due to poor installations, particularly those carried out by supposedly Samsung-trained installers. I also asked whether Samsung would send out one of its engineers like Daikin and Grant do to inspect David’s system and to see if they could identify the fault.


Following my question, the Samsung specialist promptly deleted all his comments, likely recognising that his input (and lack of acceptable answers) could potentially attract negative attention towards Samsung’s stance in not wanting to assist homeowners or consumers. Notably, his final comment, wishing David “good luck” in sorting out his dilemma was also removed.


This episode not only casts doubts on Samsung’s dedication to customer satisfaction post-sale but also highlights a potential wider issue within the industry. When installations fail to meet expectations, the lack of manufacturer intervention not only places a burden on homeowners but also negatively impacts the perception of renewable heating solutions.


The problematic installation in David’s case, presumably carried out by a Samsung-approved installer, exhibited significant flaws, such as pipework that some reputed installers have labeled as “very poor", and even the Samsung specialist hinted that the performance of the heat pump was down to a poor installation. These issues point to potential shortcomings in Samsung’s installer approval processes.


While it’s understood that manufacturers like Samsung, whose primary role is to supply and sell units, should not be directly blamed for installation errors made by independent installers, there is a pressing expectation for manufacturers to play a part in resolving such issues.


At a minimum, manufacturers should investigate reported installation problems, share findings with both the homeowner and installer, and suggest corrective actions. This approach not only helps ensure system efficiency but also bolsters customer satisfaction. As the market for renewable heating solutions grows, the way companies like Samsung handle these situations will be pivotal in shaping consumer confidence and promoting the adoption of green technologies.


So what do you think? Should heat manufacturers be more accountable when heat pumps are poorly installed?


Samsung’s Reputation on Thin Ice


I’m aware that many homeowners on our forums and website have had successful Samsung heat pump installations and that their systems are performing very well.


However, Samsung’s handling—or lack thereof—of David’s case, combined with our recent personal experiences, suggests a shift in their customer support ethos. It seems they’ve grown complacent, resting on the laurels of their established reputation, and now show less concern for customer support post-purchase when things go wrong.


My skepticism about Samsung’s commitment to its reputation, particularly regarding customer satisfaction and quality control, is not baseless. It’s been further solidified by my own troublesome experience with a Samsung fridge freezer – it’s a long read, and I’m still outraged about how Samsung have dealt with us. Despite Samsung acknowledging the issue, their response lacked the concern one would expect. Our situation mirrors the frustrations expressed by many other homeowners who have encountered similar problems with their fridges, highlighting a pattern of disregard for customer grievances.


This personal experience points to a larger problem with Samsung’s approach to customer service. The issue extends beyond the mere inconvenience of having to defrost an appliance; it touches on the basic expectations of reliability and support consumers have when they choose to invest in a brand. Samsung’s apparent indifference to product malfunctions and customer concerns raises significant questions about their dedication to maintaining their reputation and ensuring customer satisfaction.


For me, as a consumer, I’ll never buy another Samsung appliance ever again based on their lack of after-sales customer support.


 

iantelescope
1357 kWhs
1 month ago

Samsung’s Reputation?
 
My Samsung Heat Pump was , initially “installed" without an Expansion Vessel, Flow Sensor , Thermostat OR PRV .
The Flow Sensor, discovered in an unopened Box left in my kitchen was fitted in Four different locations on my pipework before the “discovery that There was No water in the Primary Water circuit " some three weeks after the start of the “Installation".
My “installer" then “discovered " A Heat Exchanger that he had “missed during the initial “Installation.
At this point I contacted the NIC asking for advice , being told to contact Samsung Dalliam in Wigan.
 
After several E-mails SAMSUNG Dalliam , the repair and support arm of Samsung, agreed to “fit a Buffer Tank for Winter  De-icing".
My then “installer’s Support Manager" intervened in Apparent Rage  saying that “his Boys were perfectly capable of installing the Buffer Tank without the “absurd costs" of SAMSUNG-DALLIAM.
SAMSUNG-DALLIAM having asked for ~£1500 per Engineer per day plus 60 per mile when travelling from Wigan!
 
MY “installer " was STRUCK_OFF for “Technical Incompetence and failure to respond to E-mails".
My “installer " blamed this fiasco on their “support Manager" who was promptly fired!.
Two months later a 50 litre 4 pipe Buffer was “Discovered Under the Desk of the now departed “Support Manager".
Two Engineers appeared on 26th October 2022 saying that “they has discovered this Buffer but did not know how or where to fit it !.
The Engineers fitted the 4 pipe Buffer using only two of the four pipes to connect across the output ports of the Heat Pump, as per Kensa.
 
Subsequently, My MSP Contacted SAMSUNG-DALLIAM arranging a further exchange of E-mails.
 
SAMSUNG-DALLIAM in November 2023 said that " I should contact a newly set up, but Samsung trained, company in Glasgow “.
 
I was informed by the newly Set up Samsung Trained Glasgow Outlet that " I would be expected to pay for a complete system re-build “.
 
My Heat Pump remains an incompetently installed Unaffordable! Oscillator!
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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